• McAllen, TX - Rio Grande Valley Orthopedic Center
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Rotator Cuff Injuries

Your rotator cuff is an integral part of your shoulder and its function free of pain. Athletes depend on it even more than the average person. At RGVO, our surgeons know how important a healthy rotator cuff is in the use of your shoulder. To help better articulate its importance – the Rotator Cuff is a powerful team of muscles and connecting tendons. These muscles and tendons attach to your upper arm and shoulder. This is what allows you to reach, throw, push, pull and lift. Without it your arm would be nearly useless. Therefore, if any damage has been done to your rotator cuff it is crucial for you to get proper examination and possibly surgery.

Your Evaluation – Before your rotator cuff can be treated, your orthopedist needs to assess your injury, which will include taking a look at your medical history and daily activities. Once your orthopedist determines your kind of injury after close examination, then the kind of treatment plan will be put into motion for you. Some of the possible plans are – Rest, Medication, Electrical Stimulation, Injections, and Fitness. If your injury doesn’t improve with the other treatments, your doctor may then suggest surgery.

Your Surgery – Depending on the level of your injury, you may need to stay overnight at the hospital or surgery center. There are two kinds of surgeries which your surgeon can elect to perform. The surgical procedures your physician may choose form are – Arthroscopic Surgery or Open Surgery. The main difference between these procedures is the size of the incision made when the surgeon operates. Open Surgery may take longer to heal from due to the bigger incision. Regardless, thanks to advanced techniques, you can look forward to good results.

Your Recovery – In the hours after surgery, your doctor or nurse will monitor your shoulder and recovery. If you have pain lingering from the surgery, you may be given medication to help with that. If your surgery does require an overnight or extended stay, it should be no longer than a day or two. Your physical therapist may begin to work with you after your surgery, but much of your recovery will depend on you and your commitment to getting your full strength back. It will be key for you to consistently perform the exercises instructed, for you to achieve the desired rehabilitation.

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