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Joint Pain

What you should know about Joint Pain and Tips that Might Help


I’m sure we’ve all experienced joint pain at one point of more in our lives.

Consequently I’m sure we can also all agree that it is no fun and can be damaging to our lives, but what exactly is Joint pain?

First let’s break it down

Joints are what make the connections between our bones. Basically our joints provide support and help us move. They can be very sensitive to damage from diseases or injury, causing issues with our mobility.

What Exactly is Joint Pain

Usually Joint pain can manifest as pain, obviously, discomfort or inflammation. You can also experience joint pain in literally any part of the joint such as the bone, cartilage, ligaments, muscles or even tendons. We commonly refer joint pain to arthritis. Arthritis is pretty much just pain and/or inflammation coming from within the joint itself.

Typical Joint Pain or Fracture?

Because it is usually difficult to physically see what is going on beneath our skin, it is sometimes possible to mistake joint pain from a fracture. To know more about fractures Click on this link.

BUT WHAT CAUSES JOINT PAIN?!

Joint Pain can be caused by a variety of things, such as:

  • Injury
  • Sprains and Strains
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Dislocation
  • Gout
  • Hypothyroidsim
  • Reactive Arthritis
  • Bone Cancer

You may be thinking Should I see a doctor?

Although most mild joint pin cases can be managed at home, it is always wise to seek professional medical help, especially when it comes to your health. If you are experiencing any joint pain or discomfort and would like to speak with a professional Call this number 956-686-6510.

You should make an appoint with your doctor if you experience any of the following:

  • Tenderness and warmth around the problem joint
  • Redness
  • Swelling

Seek Immediate Medical Attention if your joint pain was directly caused by an injury and is accompanied by:

  • Sudden Sudden Swelling
  • Joint deformity
  • Inability to use the Joint
  • Intense and pain

Speak to your doctor about these treatments!

  • Weight Management – If you lose weight you will also reduce the amount of stress put on your joints.
  • Hot and Cold Therapy – Using a heating pad or taking a long hot shower, especially in the mornings, can help loosen your joints and help start your day. You later then wrap an ice pack or some frozen veggies around your joints to help relieve some of that pain.
  • Acupuncture – This ancient Chinese medical treatment might be different than what you’re accustomed to but it is worth a shot.
  • Meditation – Meditation studies have been found to help people with painful joints. It is also great if you’re trying to get a clearer mind. You will be surprised to learn how powerful your mind can really be.
  • Dieting – Having the right kind of fatty acids may help as well! Omega-3 Fatty acids and Gamma-linolenic might be good choices.
  • Massages – Who doesn’t like a good massage? Regular massages could be beneficial in relieving your joint paint.

Bone Tumors – Knowing the Basics

Bone Tumors

General Overview

Bone tumors occur when the cells in our bones divide in an uncontrollable fashion causing a mass or lump of abnormal tissue to form. Luckily most tumors are benign, meaning not cancerous. Benign tumors are not known to spread to other regions of the body. Additionally, benign tumors are usually non-life threatening. Treatment can range from a simple observation to a surgery. Sometimes other types of diseases and conditions can resemble bone tumors and are often given the same treatment

Causes

The cause for most bone tumors is still unknown to this day.

Symptoms

Noticing a Mass on your body, could be accompanied with or without pain.
Bone tumors can also be accompanied by a fever and night sweats
Experiencing dull and aching pain in the area of the tumor.
Increased pain at night or with activity

Development

Bone tumors can develop in any bone, any part of the bone, and even go deep down into the bone marrow. No matter the type of bone tumor, any growing tumor will weaken bones and destroy healthy tissue. This will cause the bone to be more vulnerable to fractures.

Primary and Secondary bone cancer

Primary bone cancer – This is when the cancer develops and begins in the bone
Secondary bone cancer – This occurs when the cancer develops in a different part of the body and spreads to the bone.

Common primary bone cancer

  • Multiple myeloma
  • Osteosarcoma
  • Ewing’s sarcoma
  • Chondrosarcoma

Common types of cancer that can spread to the bones:

  • Breast
  • Lung
  • Thyroid
  • Renal
  • Prostate

Examination

Since stress fractures, infections and other non tumor conditions can resemble tumors, it is important to get a very thorough evaluation.

What the doctor will look for:

  • The presence of a mass
  • Tenderness or Swelling around the tumor
  • Changes in the overlying skin
  • Any effect caused by the tumor near surrounding joints.

If you feel like you might have a bone tumor, it is important that you get it checked by one of our specialists here at RGVO Orthopedics. Give us a call today to schedule your appointment. 956-686-6510

What is a Fracture? | Speak to Our Specialist

If you are in need of Assistance for a fracture, call your local orthopedic Center RGVO at 956-686-6510.

What is a fracture?

A fracture is pretty much a broken bone. First thing to remember is that fractures happen when the physical forced applied to your bone is stronger than the bone itself. They are fairly common , generally people will experience a fracture at least twice a year. However, the older you get, the more brittle your bones become and leaves you at a higher risk for fractures.

Types of bone Fractures

  • Comminuted Fracture – This is when the bone shatters into at least 3 pieces.
  • Oblique Fracture – Usually this type of fracture has an angled pattern
  • Transverse Fracture – This has a horizontal fracture line.
  • Open, compound fracture – Probably one of the most gruesome types of fractures to see is the open compound fracture. You will usually see bone sticking out of the skin with these types of fractures
    Stable fracture – Usually nothing too serious, usually means the bones are barely out of place.

Symptoms

The main and most obvious symptom for a fracture would have to be intense pain, almost unbearable.
However there are other symptoms you should know about such as:

  • Deformity – This is your number one indicator of a fracture. Usually when something looks so out of place or your arm/leg bends in a way that doesn’t it shouldn’t you can safely assume there’s an issue there.
  • Swelling – Another Symptom of a fractured bone would have to be swelling. Swelling happens when fluids leak into the soft tissues in your body caused by an injury.
  • Bruising – Bruises can happen very easily and doesn’t always relate to a fractured bone. However if the bruised area is rather large that might be cause for concern , this usually means the damage is more serious.

Treatment for Fractures

There different types of treatment depending on the type of fracture you may have.

    • Casting – The broken bones are put back into their normal place and then wrapped in a plaster or fiberglass to prevent them from moving while they heal.
    • Traction – A realignment of the bones by means of steady pulling force
    • External fixation – This is a little more extreme. Pins are wires are locked through your skin and onto the bone. These pins and wires are then connected to an outside stabilizer to hold everything in place.
    • Internal fixation – This is when the doctors put in either metal rods, wires or screws inside your bone to keep it together.

Fractures are not joke and can cause some serious consequences if not taken care of properly. Be sure you put your fractured bones in the right hands and Call RGVO today! 956-686-6510.

What is a Fracture? | Speak to Our Specialist

If you are in need of Assistance for a fracture, call your local orthopedic Center RGVO at 956-686-6510.

What is a fracture?

A fracture is pretty much a broken bone. First thing to remember is that fractures happen when the physical forced applied to your bone is stronger than the bone itself. They are fairly common , generally people will experience a fracture at least twice a year. However, the older you get, the more brittle your bones become and leaves you at a higher risk for fractures.

Types of bone Fractures

  • Comminuted Fracture – This is when the bone shatters into at least 3 pieces.
  • Oblique Fracture – Usually this type of fracture has an angled pattern
  • Transverse Fracture – This has a horizontal fracture line.
  • Open, compound fracture – Probably one of the most gruesome types of fractures to see is the open compound fracture. You will usually see bone sticking out of the skin with these types of fractures
    Stable fracture – Usually nothing too serious, usually means the bones are barely out of place.

Symptoms

The main and most obvious symptom for a fracture would have to be intense pain, almost unbearable.
However there are other symptoms you should know about such as:

  • Deformity – This is your number one indicator of a fracture. Usually when something looks so out of place or your arm/leg bends in a way that doesn’t it shouldn’t you can safely assume there’s an issue there.
  • Swelling – Another Symptom of a fractured bone would have to be swelling. Swelling happens when fluids leak into the soft tissues in your body caused by an injury.
  • Bruising – Bruises can happen very easily and doesn’t always relate to a fractured bone. However if the bruised area is rather large that might be cause for concern , this usually means the damage is more serious.

Treatment for Fractures

There different types of treatment depending on the type of fracture you may have.

    • Casting – The broken bones are put back into their normal place and then wrapped in a plaster or fiberglass to prevent them from moving while they heal.
    • Traction – A realignment of the bones by means of steady pulling force
    • External fixation – This is a little more extreme. Pins are wires are locked through your skin and onto the bone. These pins and wires are then connected to an outside stabilizer to hold everything in place.
    • Internal fixation – This is when the doctors put in either metal rods, wires or screws inside your bone to keep it together.

Fractures are not joke and can cause some serious consequences if not taken care of properly. Be sure you put your fractured bones in the right hands and Call RGVO today! 956-686-6510.

What you should know about Degenerative Joint Disease

What is Degenerative Joint Disease?

Degenerative join disease, also known as Osteoarthritis (OA) , is when the cartilage that cushions your joints become deteriorated . Unfortunately it is a common wear and tear disease. The most commonly affected joints are the hands, knees, hips, and spine. However this can affect any joint in the body.

General Information

People over the age of 65 are affected the most by degenerative joint disease. Osteoarthritis is a chronic long lasting condition. It can cause a lot of pain, stiffness and a few other symptoms. It is one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. Over 30 million men and women are affected by this disease.

Factors that contribute to Osteoarthritis

  • Age
  • Genetics
  • Gender
  • Sports injuries
  • Physical labor, kneeling, squatting

Symptoms

Osteoarthritis symptoms develop at a slow rate and worsen as time goes by. Signs and symptoms of OA include:

  • Pain – You may feel pain or discomfort after moving certain joints
  • Tenderness – Your joint might feel tender even when the lightest pressure is applied
  • Stiffness – You may experience some stiffness, especially in the morning when you wake up
  • Bone spurs – These are small bits of bone that form around the affected joint. They feel like hard lumps
  • Scraping sounds – You may hear some scraping noises when you move your joints
  • Loss of flexibility – restricted range in movement.

Other Risk factors

Women over the age of 55 are in higher risk of Osteoarthritis. Repetitive motions are also a factor. Infections and rheumatoid arthritis could contribute to OA as well. Additionally, Muscular dystrophy, osteoporosis, sickle cell disease, obesity, hormone and other bone disorders can result in Osteoarthritis.

When to consult a Doctor

You should see a doctor when you experience joint stiffness or pain and doesn’t seem to go away.

Foot Deformities, Diseases and Disorders

 

RGV Orthopedics foot and bone specialists

Foot Deformities, Deformities and Disorders

Overview

Your feet are one of the most complex parts of your body. The average foot contains about 28 bones, 33 joints and over 100 muscles, ligaments and tendons! We take about 5,000 steps every day; obviously it is important to keep our feet healthy.

You can divide the foot into three different sections:

  • The forefoot which contains the phalanges, or the toes, and the metatarsals.
  • The midfoot or as we refer to as the arches.
  • The hindfoot, also known as the heel and ankle.

Types of foot Diseases, Deformities, and Disorders

Pes Planus – Commonly referred to as flat foot. Flat foot is one of the most common structural foot deformities. The deformity can be obtained if your ligaments stop being able to support your foot structure due to injury.
Hammer Toes – Hammer toes, named because of their appearance , occur when the joint closest to the foot collapses.
Claw toes – Similar to the Hammer toe, Claw toe occurs when the join closest to the nail collapses.
Both Hammer and Claw Toes are flexible and can be manually straightened out. A soft tissue correction could correct a flexible deformity.
Ingrown Toenail – One of the most common foot disorders. It can be caused by many things such as

  • Inconsistent Growth
  • Cutting a nail to short
  • Changes in bone structure

Athletes foot – Another common condition where the skin of the foot gets infected by fungus. There are two main forms of athletes foot, Acute and Chronic. At first you will see blisters on the arches of the foot, but you may also see the skin between the toes also being affected.

Preparations before seeing a doctor – Before you visit a doctor, you should have the following things in mind and prepared.

  • Reports of family history with any foot disorders.
  • Full report of you and your family’s medical history.
  • The Effectiveness of any treatments and/or medications you are currently on.

Your Hospital Stay After Hip Replacement Surgery

Your Hospital Stay After Hip Replacement Surgery

You will be moved to your room when you are awake. By then your family or a friend will be able to join you. You can expect to feel some pain. To gain the best pain relief, answer honestly when you are asked how much you hurt. During your hospital stay, you’ll learn how to protect your new hip while doing daily activities.

In Your Hospital Room

You’ll be watched closely on the day of surgery. Any or all of the equipment below may be provided for your safety and comfort.

  • A foam wedge or pillows may be placed between your legs. This is to help keep your new hip in place during early healing.
  • A bar (trapeze) may be hanging over the bed. Use it to help lift your body when you change positions.
  • Special stockings may be used to reduce the risk of blood clots. You may also be given medication to help prevent clots.

Managing Plan

At first you may feel pain, even with medication. This is normal. But if your pain is not reduced at all, be sure to tell the nurse. Pain medication may be injected into a muscle or delivered by IV into the bloodstream.

You’re in Control with PCA

PCA (Patient-Controlled Analgesia) allows you to control your own pain medication. When you push a button, pain medication is pumped through an IV line. PCA pumps can provide a steady level of pain relief. And with their built-in safety features, you can be assured that you will not get too much medication.

Protect Your New Hip

Until it heals, your hip will have a limited range of motion. To protect your new joint, keep your knees level with or below your hips when you sit.

Avoid Risky Movements

At first some movements will put too much strain on your new hip joint. This could cause the ball to slip from its socket. A physical therapist will teach you which movements to avoid. A few of the most risky ones are listed below:

  • Don’t let your knee cross the midline of your body
  • Instead, sit with both feet on the floor, with your knees 6 inches apart
  • Don’t plant your foot and rotate your new hip inward
  • Instead, turn both your feet and your body
  • Don’t bend all the way over from the waist
  • Instead, use a device such as a long handle d grasper to reach down

Planning for Spinal Fusion Surgery

Spinal Fusion Surgery

Planning for Spinal Fusion Surgery

Living with a problem back or neck can be frustrating. Pain may keep you from doing what you like or need to do. You may have tried other treatments, including surgery, which didn’t relieve your pain. Now, you and your doctor have decided that spinal fusion may be the best way to control your pain. Spinal fusion permanently connects two or more bones in your spine. This booklet lets you know what to expect before, during, and after your surgery.

Your Painful Spine

Back or neck problems can have many causes. They include:

  • Damage from overuse
  • Damage from an injury
  • Medical problems such as arthritis
  • No matter what the cause, the weakness, numbness, or pain that you feel is disrupting your life. You may find it hard to do your job, excercise, or keep up with your daily errands. And your family and social life may be strained as a result. But relief may be within your reach.

    Spinal Fusion May Help

    During spinal fusion, your surgeon locks together, or fuses, some of the bones in your spine. This limits the movement of these bones, which may help relieve your pain. Your back or neck won’t be quite as flexible. Even so, you may feel more flexible after a fusion because you can move with less pain.

    Types of Spinal Fusion Surgery

    Which section of the spine is fused depends on where your pain is. Sections of the spine that may be fused include:

  • The neck (called cervical fusion)
  • The lower back (called lumbar fusion)
  • Fusion can be done from the front (anterior) side of the body or the back (posterior) side of the body.
  • Your surgeon will decide which is best for you.

    Shoulder Pain | Replacing Your Worn Shoulder

    Shoulder Pain | Replacing Your Worn Shoulder

    Replacing Your Worn Shoulder

    A stiff, painful shoulder can keep you from doing even simple things, like dressing yourself or carrying groceries. But there’s good news. A worn-out shoulder can be replaced, just as a bad hip or knee can be. Shoulder replacement is safe and reliable. Surgery relieves the pain and may let you return to many of your normal activities.

    When Your Shoulder Hurts

    If you do heavy work or play active sports, your shoulder may have become worn and arthritic from overuse or torn from an injury. Or you may have a chronic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis, that has destroyed the joint. If you’ve had a bad fall, you may have broken your shoulder. Whatever the cause, your shoulder is stiff and painful. You may not be able to use your arm to reach behind your back or over your head. Your pain may be worse at night, when you’re active, or when it’s cold and damp. If heat, rest, exercise, and medication haven’t relieved your pain, your doctor may be recommending replacement surgery.

    Replacement Surgery Can Help

    Shoulder replacement surgery almost always relieves pain and may give you more strength and movement in your shoulder. During surgery, an orthopaedic surgeon (a doctor who specializes in treating bone and joint diseases) replaces all or part of your problem shoulder with an artificial joint, called a prosthesis. The prosthesis replaces the rough, worn parts of your shoulder with smooth metal and plastic parts.

    How The Knee Works

    How The Knee Works

    A healthy knee bends easily. The joint absorbs stress and glides smoothly. This allows you to walk, squat, and turn without pain. But when the knee is damaged, the joint may lose its ability to cushion stress. You may feel pain during movement. Sometimes a damaged knee joint will swell and hurt even when you are at rest.

    A Healthy Knee

    The knee is a hinge joint, formed where the thigh bone and shinbone meet. When the knee is healthy, the joint moves freely. This is because the joint is covered with slippery tissue and powered by large muscles.

  • Cartilage is a layer smooth, soft tissue. It covers the ends of the thigh bone and shinbone, and it lines the underside of the kneecap. Healthy cartilage absorbs stress and allows the knee to glide easily.
  • Ligaments are another type of soft tissue. They hold the bones of the joint together.
  • Muscles power the knee and leg for movement.
  • Tendons attach the muscles to the bones.
  • A Damaged Knee

    When one or more parts of the knee are damaged, joint movement suffers. Over time, cartilage starts to crack or wear away. Because cartilage cannot fully repair itself, the damage may keep increasing. At first, your knee may just be a little stiff. But as the bones of the joint begin rubbing together, you’re likely to feel pain.

    Osteoarthritis

    Years of normal use can cause cartilage to crack and wear away (osteoarthritis). As exposed bones rub together, they become rough and pitted. The joint grinds. Being overweight or having an alignment problem, such as knocked or bowed knees, puts extra force on the joint. This may speed up the damage.

    Inflammatory Arthritis

    A chronic disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis or gout, can cause swelling and heat (inflammation) in the joint lining. As the disease progresses, cartilage may be worn away and the joint may stiffen.

    Injury

    A bad fall or blow to the knee can injure the joint. If the injury does not heal properly, extra force may be placed on the joint. Over time, this can cause the cartilage to wear away (traumatic arthritis).

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